Five Business Capabilities Essential to Personalized Digital Experiences

You have heard a lot – likely an awful lot – about the ways advances in technology are impacting customer experience in the insurance industry: how they drive service beyond what customers expect by adapting with them as their lives change, by managing changes to their plans and policies with ease, and by offering a consistent experience across platforms and interactions. All that’s needed is to tap into it, right? Not so fast, say those in the trenches.

Going Digital? Customer Expectations have Big Implications

As insurers drive to expand and grow in an increasingly digital marketplace, it is understood that excellent customer service is no longer a standout, but a standard. In the last two years, the number one strategic investment across the insurance industry has been in improving customer engagement. Why so much emphasis?

Insurance Disruption Managed with Agile + DevOps + Cloud

Few would dispute that in the long history of insurance there has been a disruption in the fundamental process around how carriers acquire, service and maintain their client base that comes anywhere close to the scale we are experiencing today. Insurer business units and their colleagues in IT operations and system development need ways to respond to the challenge. None wish to be caught holding stone chisels in a digital world.

Is Mass Personalization Your Key to Winning on Main Street?

How to make your benefits products a good fit for small businesses

Looked at from a marketing lens, my personal truth is that I am a demographic of one. And anyone who can grasp that and understands my needs and preferences will score some serious points and wallet share. This type of mass personalization could be key to successful benefits insurance small case marketing on Main Street.

You Can Do What? A Zero Data Entry, Bot-Enabled Quote, Buy and Claim?

 Forget “15 minutes could save you 15% on car insurance.” This popular insurance advertising meme makes me want to ask wouldn’t your customers prefer to save not only more time and money, but the effort also? This is precisely the new value that is being achieved with new digital engagement technologies, and customers like it.

Is Small the New Big? Small Businesses are Opportunity for Benefits Insurers

You have surely heard it said that small businesses are the growth engine for America.  Today, the phrase has a special ring to it for benefits insurers. The small business market is often viewed as an opportunity attractive to growth-minded insurers because the focus of the majority of carriers is on the larger, highly-competitive end of the market.

It’s Groundhog Day for Benefits Enrollment Technology

Photo courtesy of http://bit.ly/1tVwkpT

On February 2, Groundhog Day, something different happened at the annual LIMRA Enrollment Technology Strategy Seminar (ETSS). For the last three years, EIS Group has sponsored ETSS and each year, the latest approaches and challenges to benefits enrollment are discussed. But just as the venerable Punxsutawney Phil himself is prone to do, each year the attendees see their long shadows – of legacy technology constraints – and withdraw to comfortable, insulated dens rather than embrace an early spring of much-needed change. Not this year. For the first time, the conference coalesced around the root cause of enrollment problems: connectivity.

Insurance Doing Digital Right. Who, How and Why?

What side of the digital divide are you on? You’ll find the answer in the new ACORD/Genpact report, Assessing Digital Impact Across Insurer and Channel Operations, which offers insight into the traits that make up either a digital leader or a laggard. It turns out that the great majority of “digital leaders” are those companies that have successfully aligned the back and middle office with the front office.

What is Your Core Customer Intelligence Score?

How smart do insurers have to be to engage customers? Just how much customer data from sources near and far and how much analysis of customer behavior is necessary to create an effective engagement model? The answer may as well be, “How much money are you willing to spend?” Overlooked, however, is the fact that core systems data is actually customer insight lying in plain sight.  How can insurers get at it and use it for intelligent engagement? Why must they?